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Joy Lukachick

Stories by Joy

A $2.6 million taxpayer-funded project is under way to digitize hundreds of thousands of city records — a project that Mayor Andy Berke's staff says will increase government transparency and efficiency.

A taxpayer-funded project that a judge struck down because of secret negotiations and a conflict of interest was re-approved Friday amid new accusations of impropriety.

Despite public opposition from residents and three City Council members, the city's Industrial Development Board voted today to re-approve the controversial taxpayer financing agreement that would subsidize a road up Aetna Mountain from the Black Creek golf course community.

For 30 minutes Tuesday, the City Council chambers sounded more like a music hall than a legislative meeting place.

After making multiple changes to the proposed sound ordinance, City Council voted to defer the ordinance for one week.

Chattanooga's proposed sound ordinance was supposed to fix — or at least offer a legal solution to — the noise complaints associated with the popular music venue Track 29.

Even though 63 percent of voting Chattanoogans overturned the city's domestic partner ordinance in Thursday's election, events playing out on the national stage could make their preference moot.

Retired state economic director Patsy Hazlewood is the Republican nominee for House District 27.

Nearly a year of public debate over whether Chattanooga should provide benefits to its employees' gay or straight partners ended at the polls Thursday with a resounding "no."

Chattanooga city attorneys asked the City Council on Tuesday to decide if 13 revisions should be made to the sound ordinance by casting what appeared to be a secret vote.

Chattanooga City Council voted 8-1 to approve a payment-in-lieu-of-taxes, or PILOT, agreement for developers building housing downtown.

A cascade of new public and private deals to bolster shopping, dining and entertainment venues in downtown Chattanooga has boosted hopes for a second renaissance in the core of the Scenic City.

Payment-in-lieu-of-taxes, or PILOT, agreements are a favorite tool for attracting investments and jobs from companies like Volkswagen, Coca-Cola and Chattem.

A push by the service workers union to raise Chattanooga employees' wages has led to a campaign by garbage collectors, sewage workers, librarians and others that now has the attention of City Hall.

A swelling crowd Tuesday night supported a move at the Chattanooga City Council in support of revamping the city's sound ordinance to breathe new life into the music and entertainment options downtown.

A large crowd gathered tonight to voice their thoughts for the city's proposed sound ordinance that would create an entertainment area where venues with permits could crank up their music until midnight on the weekend.

What helped make the Southside bustle in the mid-1970s could now become the catalyst for a new Chattanooga entertainment and music district.

Chattanooga Choo Choo officials announced today a $7 million restoration project that will add add two new restaurants and an additional 500 - person music venue.

The divide between Miller Plaza, the red-brick courtyard and attached pavilion in the core of Chattanooga's city center, and Miller Park is five lanes of traffic on M.L. King Boulevard.

After Hamilton County Schools officials celebrated what they felt was a win for the system and City Council members had patted themselves on the backs for settling the liquor taxes lawsuit, one county commissioner tried to bring the $11.7 million agreement to a halt.

From Hair of the Dog on the corner of Market and Fourth streets past Track 29 off Main Street, the city is proposing a sound ordinance that would allow the bars and music venues in this defined area to crank up their music much louder until midnight on the weekends and 11 p.m. on weekdays.

The long awaited noise ordinance that Southside residents had hoped would put a stop to loud concerts at Track 29 creates an entertainment area that runs from 4th Street past Main Street where businesses with a permit could ramp up their music until midnight on the weekends.

A new audit of EPB concludes that the utility underbilled the city of Chattanooga for street lighting, but that claim was immediately challenged by Chattanooga's internal auditor.

For more than a year, neighbors of Track 29 have complained of loud concerts that rattle pictures on their walls and keep them awake at night.

The Eastgate Senior Center is likely safe for now. Though without much help from Chattanooga officials, seniors say.

A project to tear down all 440 apartments at Chattanooga's former Harriet Tubman public housing site to make way for a new industrial site is set to begin in September.

An offer that Mayor Andy Berke's office scoffed at months ago now mirrors a proposed settlement giving Hamilton County Schools nearly everything it asked for in the ongoing dispute over millions in delinquent liquor taxes.

For many seniors, the Eastgate Senior Center has been a place of refuge to heal from a lost spouse or a place to get time away from grandchildren they're helping to raise. A place for friendship, a haven.

The blame-shifting and bickering between Chattanooga and Hamilton County Schools officials over millions of dollars in delinquent liquor-by-the-drink taxes could end Friday with a settlement that gives school officials most of what they asked for.

The Chattanooga City Council will vote today on a new face for the community outreach side of Mayor Andy Berke's crime-fighting initiative.

City Council will vote Tuesday on whether to award Hope for the Inner City with the contract to run the community side of Mayor Andy Berke's violence reduction plan to reduce shootings and killings in Chattanooga.

The back-and-forth dispute between Chattanooga and Hamilton County Schools officials over millions in delinquent liquor-by-the-drink taxes that the city owes may come to an end this week.

Imagine a city where residents can walk to coffeeshops and bike to a nearby grocery store, where each neighborhood is built specifically to the make-up of that community.

Chattanooga Mayor Andy Berke has lost his second chief operating officer in his first 15 months of office.

Brent Goldberg has been named chief operating officer under Mayor Andy Berke.

Despite a national news story dinging Chattanooga for a bike-sharing program that is 90 percent below its projected goal, Chattanooga transportation officials say they are considering whether to expand.

As the Scenic City continues to get national recognition as an outdoor sports-friendly city, Chattanooga officials have funneled funds to fix two of the bridges that runners, cyclists and walkers cross daily on their regular routes.

Eleven months after Mayor Andy Berke stood on the eroded tennis court at Lincoln Park and promised the land under his feet would once again be a city park, Chattanooga officials took the first step to make it happen.

Councilman Chris Anderson plans to begin hosting community meetings by next month to start developing a 10-acre park that could range from athletic fields to a playground in Alton Park.

Chattanooga officials approved the first reading of the 2015 capital budget that includes $2.8 million for Walnut Street Bridge repairs and $4 million as part of the project to demolish the former Harriet Tubman public housing site.

The City Council is set to vote tonight on giving Erlanger officials an eight-acre tract of land in Alton Park – the first step to a promise Mayor Andy Berke made to preserve Lincoln Park.

A judge's ruling Monday may not be the final word in a dispute over wording of a referendum that will go before voters on Aug. 7, but this much is clear:

More than half of the Chattanooga Police Department will get raises in their next paychecks as Mayor Andy Berke's plan to fix a decade of unequal pay on the force takes hold.

There's no simple answer for reducing poverty.

Mayor Andy Berke unveiled a plan today that will give Chattanooga police officers a 3 percent pay raise every two years, promising to fix years of unequal pay within the department.

Chattanooga officials want to make an example of mile-long stretch of Brainerd Road by regulating building fronts, street edges and parking to beautify the decrepit area and create space for walkers and bikers.

Volkswagen quality inspector Sean Moss knows it takes a strategic plan to find front-row parking at the largest industrial park in the region, Enterprise South.

Chattanooga officials want a judge to decide immediately what language should be on the August ballot for voters deciding whether city employees' domestic partners should have city benefits.

Chattanooga City Council voted to sue the Hamilton County Election Commission over the ballot question related to the same-sex ordinance.

Twenty years after saving the Walnut Street Bridge, community leaders say the 2,376-foot-long connector from the North Shore to downtown needs to be repainted, its rotting boards replaced and lights fixed.

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